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Project Updates

August 12, 2014
Power Line Construction Continues

Crews are continuing power line construction activities, as well as right of way restoration activities in areas where the new poles and wires have already been installed.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line is on schedule to be completed by Spring 2015.

Here is the latest update of construction activities:

Wire Stringing and Implosive Splicing
Stringing new wire will continue along Ranch Road in Blooming Grove Township, and implosive splicing will be starting this week.

Splicing with implosive charges is safe but it is loud – like a large clap of thunder or a commercial firework. We will notify residents near the work area in advance. Access to the right of way will be restricted during wire stringing and splicing operations for safety reasons. Traffic control measures will be in place during the stringing work, as needed.

Construction
In Pike County, foundation work continues in the vicinity of High Knob Road in Blooming Grove Township and Whitaker Road in Porter Township. Foundation work begins near High Line Road in Porter Township, as well as near Smoke Ridge Court, Round Hill Drive, and West Sugar Mountain Road in Lehman Township.

In Saw Creek Estates, foundation work will start in the near future near Kirkham Drive.

Crews will continue to erect new poles along Ranch Road and High Knob Road in Blooming Grove Township. In Greene Township new poles will begin to go up along Hob Day Road. The new poles will range from 165 to 195 feet in height depending on topography.

Road and pad construction will continue along Creek Road in Lehman Township.

Demolition work has been completed and foundation work continues at the Bushkill Substation in Middle Smithfield Township, Monroe County.

Restoration
In Lackawanna County, restoration work continues along North Sekol Avenue in Ransom Township, Newton Road in Newton Township, Salem Road and Hudson Street in Archbald.

In South Canaan Township, Wayne County, restoration work continues near Mountain Road, Cortez Road and Reed Road, and work will begin in the vicinity of Mid Valley Road and Shaffer Road. In Paupack Township, restoration work will begin near the Owego Turnpike.

Tower Demolition
Tower demolition will continue along Whittaker Road, Route 402 and Beaver Run Road in Porter Township.

Surveying
Survey crews continue to work throughout the project area.


July 30, 2013

Implosive Splicing
Crews will be installing new wires on the new poles in Wayne County using a helicopter and equipment on the ground. The wires will be spliced using implosive charges in the vicinity of Stock Farm Road, Lake Township. This process is safe but it is loud – like a large clap of thunder or a commercial firework. We will notify residents near the work area in advance. Access to the right of way will be restricted during wire stringing and splicing operations for safety reasons.

Construction
Access road and crane pad construction continues in Lackawanna County near Lewis and McLean streets in Dickson City, Route 307/Morgan Highway in Scranton along with Salem Road and Mountain Road in Jefferson Township. Access road and crane pad construction will begin in the vicinity of Peaceful Valley Road in Scott Township. In Pike County, road and pad construction continues near Kimbles Road in Palmyra Township.

In Lackawanna County, crews continue to drill, excavate, set and pour pole foundations in the vicinity of Route 307/Morgan Highway in Scranton, Lewis and McLean streets in Dickson City, Newton Road in Newton Township, along with Salem Road and Mountain Road in Jefferson Township. In Wayne County, foundation work will begin along Route 6 in Palmyra Township, Beaver Run Lane in Lake Township and continue near Hoadley’s Road and the Owego Turnpike in Paupack Township.

In Ransom, South Canaan, Lake and Paupack Townships, poles will continue to be erected as foundations are completed. The new poles will range from 165 to 195 feet in height depending on topography.

Demolition
We will be removing the old lattice structures along Salem and Mountain Roads in Jefferson Township, Lackawanna County.

Surveying
Survey crews continue to work throughout the project area.

Lackawanna Substation
Construction of the new substation continues in Blakely. These construction activities involve heavy truck traffic along Rustic Lane and the use of heavy equipment on PPL’s property and rights of way. For your safety, please exercise caution along Rustic Lane and keep out of the construction zone. 

December 4, 2012 - Susquehanna-Roseland construction contractor outlines economic benefits for Pike and Wayne counties

HONESDALE (December 4, 2012)—Construction of the Susquehanna-Roseland power line will create jobs and will mean “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in benefits for the Wayne and Pike county areas, local business leaders were told at a recent meeting.

Representatives of T&D Power, Inc., which has been contracted by PPL Electric Utilities to build the 100-mile-long Pennsylvania portion of the power line, said they will be hiring workers through Local 1319 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union. The company also expects to buy local materials and services as part of the massive construction project.

“We expect to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars in this region during this multi-year project,” said Peter Demars, T&D vice president. “We are working with a local real estate agency and have already leased some property in Sterling Township as a staging area for our work.”

Attending the meeting were the executive directors of the Wayne County Chamber of Commerce, the Southern Wayne Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Pocono Lake Region Chamber of Commerce, the executive director of the Wayne Economic Development Corporation, the executive director of Workforce Wayne, a staff member for State Rep. Mike Peifer, and other business leaders.

The meeting was arranged by Paul Canevari, PPL’s Pocono regional community relations director. “Besides improving electric service for everyone in this region, this project also will have a significant benefit for our local economy,” Canevari said. “I wanted local business leaders to hear the details of these benefits first-hand.”

“We look forward to the completion of The Susquehanna-Roseland project, which will position the region for future growth and increased commerce,” said Donna LaBar, executive director of the Wayne County Chamber of Commerce. “The Wayne and Pike County Chambers of Commerce are eager to assist T&D Power as they establish contracts with local vendors for materials and services needed. The Chambers appreciate the informational project sessions and member business opportunities that PPL Electric Utilities have arranged and shared with the Pocono Lake Region, Southern Wayne, and Wayne County chambers.”

“I am pleased that PPL and T & D Power reached out to our chambers of commerce and economic development organizations about vendor opportunities relative to the Susquehanna-Roseland power line. The more we work together to connect our vendors to this project, the more our region will benefit,” said Mary Beth Wood, executive director of the Wayne Economic Development Corporation.

October 2, 2012 - Susquehanna-Roseland line receives final federal approval
Construction under way; key grid reinforcement to be in service by June 2015

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line, a major grid upgrade that will improve electric service for millions of people in the Northeast, received final approval from the National Park Service when the agency issued a Record of Decision late Monday (10/1) affirming the utility-chosen route.

In addition to boosting electric service reliability, the new line will create jobs, reduce electric bills for some customers and provide a significant economic stimulus to the region. The project was one of seven priority grid upgrades nationwide named to the federal Rapid Response Team for Transmission.

The companies building the project, PPL Electric Utilities in Pennsylvania and Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in New Jersey, have started construction activities along some areas of the 145-mile route. The line is expected to be in service before the summer peak electricity demand period of 2015.

“This new line will reinforce our nation’s critical energy infrastructure for future generations,” said Ralph LaRossa, president and chief operating officer of PSE&G, and Gregory N. Dudkin, president of PPL Electric Utilities, in a joint statement. “It will ensure that homes and businesses in a multistate region continue to enjoy safe and reliable electric service long into the future.”

The new, 500-kilovolt power line will run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J. The independent regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, ordered the new line to prevent overloads on other existing power lines. PJM recently reconfirmed the need for the line to correct grid reliability concerns.

It is estimated that the project will save consumers more than $200 million per year by relieving congestion that currently exists on the power grid.

The utilities’ chosen route has already been approved by both the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. About 95 percent of the route will follow the path of an existing 85-year-old power line that must be replaced because it is approaching the end of its useful life and is undersized for today’s electricity demands. Following an existing power line route significantly reduces the project’s overall impact on people and the environment.

The route crosses about four miles of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail on the path of an existing power line. The utilities already have an existing property easement through the park service units, and the existing line had been in place for decades before the park units were established.

To mitigate for unavoidable impacts of the power line on federal lands, as required by the National Park Service, PPL Electric Utilities and PSE&G will contribute to a fund administered by a nonprofit group. As directed by the National Park Service, the money will be used to purchase or preserve land for public use, compensate for wetlands impacts, and fund cultural and historic preservation activities.

The size of the fund, at least $56 million, was determined by the National Park Service assessment of project impacts. Mitigation is a routine part of the environmental impact review process when there are impacts on federal lands from power lines or other infrastructure improvements needed by society. Mitigation typically is required by federal agencies for impacts that cannot be avoided.

The Susquehanna-Roseland project does not require significant widening of the existing right of way on federal land: The current utility corridor through the National Park Service has cleared widths of up to 200 feet. The only additional right of way and clearing needed by the utilities is 50 additional feet of right of way for seven-tenths of a mile in Pennsylvania where the existing corridor is 100 feet wide. Several miles of the companies’ easements are wider than the 200 feet needed for the project, and the excess easement areas will be transferred to the NPS as part of the mitigation plan.

The Obama administration selected the Susquehanna-Roseland line in October 2011 for fast-track treatment by the administration’s Rapid Response Team for Transmission. The team was formed to streamline the review and permitting of transmission line projects to increase reliability and save consumers money by modernizing the grid, while ensuring careful federal review. The Susquehanna-Roseland project will create about 2,000 jobs during its 2 1/2-year construction period.

The two utilities have many of the permits required for construction along the route, and have pending applications with federal, state and local authorities to obtain the balance of the permits that are needed. The National Park Service has said it intends to issue the required federal construction permits soon.

October 1, 2012 - Contract awarded for power line construction

PPL Electric Utilities has awarded the main construction contract for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line to T&D Power Inc., an Arizona-based company that specializes in high voltage power line construction.

T&D Power will use craft personnel from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Union Local 1319 to staff the project, as well as subcontractors as needed. The company also will establish contracts with local vendors for its material and services needs.

The contract is valued at about $200 million.

June 20, 2012 - Preparations for Construction of Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line to Begin in Mid-July
Project Will Improve Electric Service for Customers in Pennsylvania and Throughout the Region

ALLENTOWN, Pa. (June 20, 2012) -- Pre-construction activities for the Susquehanna-Roseland regional power line project will begin in the Scranton area in mid-July, PPL Electric Utilities said Wednesday (6/20), with line construction expected to start later this year.

Work generally will move west to east along the line route in Pennsylvania, in Luzerne, Lackawanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe counties. Meanwhile, Public Service Electric & Gas Co. crews will be working later this summer on the New Jersey portion of the project. The line is expected to be in service in time to meet peak summer electricity demand in 2015.

The Susquehanna-Roseland line will run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J. The independent regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, ordered the new line to prevent overloads on other power lines. The project will create about 2,000 jobs during its three-year construction period.

The line will have significant benefits for electric customers in Pennsylvania and the surrounding region. It will include a new substation in the Scranton area that will provide additional, direct improvements to the reliability of electric service for homes and businesses in that region.

About 95 percent of the 145-mile route will follow the path of an existing power line, minimizing impacts on people and the environment. The new line is planned to cross the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail on the path of an existing 85-year-old power line that must be replaced because it is approaching the end of its useful life.

The National Park Service is scheduled to complete its review of the project by October. The project also has been approved by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities.

Pre-construction activities along the route in Pennsylvania will include removing trees and other vegetation from the right of way where necessary, and construction of access roads so construction crews can safely reach locations of the new poles. Later, crews will install foundations at pole locations, erect poles and string wires.

“At PPL Electric Utilities, we are committed to completing this important project safely, and with as little effect on the day-to-day activities of area residents as possible,” said David Bonenberger, the company’s general manager-Transmission and Substations. “We thank everyone in advance for their patience during the temporary inconvenience of construction.”

Property owners along the line route will be contacted in advance of construction work, and will be kept informed of progress. More information for property owners is available on the project website, www.pplreliablepower.com/susquehanna-roseland. The company will host an informational open house for property owners along the portion of the route where preconstruction work will begin from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 26, at the Newton Ransom Volunteer Fire Company, 1890 Newton Ransom Blvd., Clarks Summit, Pa.

PPL Electric Utilities, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation (NYSE: PPL), provides electric delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania and has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com.

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Note to Editors: Visit our media website at www.pplnewsroom.com for additional news and background about PPL Corporation.

March 29, 2012 - Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line Takes Major Step Forward
National Park Service Agrees with PPL, PSE&G on Route

The National Park Service selection of the route preferred by Public Service Electric and Gas Co. and PPL Electric Utilities Corp. – a route already approved by utility regulators – is a major step forward for the Susquehanna-Roseland project, a regional power line that will have significant benefits for millions of electricity users.

PPL Electric Utilities and PSE&G are building the transmission line to improve electric service in the Northeast. It will prevent overloads on other power lines. The park service selection of the utilities’ route as the NPS Preferred Alternative, part of the ongoing Environmental Impact Statement process, is a significant milestone for the project.

“We commend the National Park Service for its very thorough review, and for concluding that our proposed route provides the most appropriate balance of meeting society’s energy needs while minimizing impacts to federal lands,” said Gregory N. Dudkin, president of PPL Electric Utilities, and Ralph LaRossa, president and chief operating officer of PSE&G, in a joint statement.

The utility executives pledged to continue to work closely with the park service to finalize details of a major land purchase that will benefit the public and the environment. The companies also pledged to work tirelessly to avoid and minimize impacts of the project wherever possible.

Mitigation is a routine part of the environmental impact review process when there are impacts on federal lands from power lines or other infrastructure improvements needed by society. Mitigation typically is required by federal agencies for impacts that cannot be avoided.

Under the mitigation package proposed by PPL Electric Utilities and PSE&G, thousands of acres of land would be purchased or preserved. The total value of the package will depend on the final assessment of impacts by the park service, but the utilities’ current estimate is that the cost would be $30 million to $40 million.

These acquisitions would protect scenic vistas for hikers on the Appalachian Trail and could significantly expand National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service land holdings.

In addition, the mitigation package could potentially bridge gaps between existing federal and state lands. This would create a half-million-acre swath of contiguous publicly owned or preserved natural lands for recreation and wildlife preservation.

The mitigation package would have a lasting benefit for National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service lands, for conservation and wildlife interests, and for the people who visit these areas now and in the future. To advise and assist in executing the land transactions, the utilities are working with a number of national, regional and local organizations.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line is being built to maintain the reliability of the electric grid for millions of people in the Northeast. In addition, it is estimated that the project will save consumers more than $200 million per year by relieving congestion on the power grid, which will reduce electric bills for some customers.
The Susquehanna-Roseland power line will run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J. The independent regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, ordered the new line to prevent violations of national standards for the operation of the nation’s electric power grid. PJM recently reconfirmed the need for the line.

The utilities’ chosen route has already been approved by both the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. About 95 percent of this 145-mile route would follow the path of an existing 85-year-old power line that must be replaced because it is approaching the end of its useful life and is undersized for today’s electricity demands. Following an existing power line route will help reduce the project’s overall impact on people and the environment.

The route crosses about four miles of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail on the path of an existing power line. The utilities already have an existing property easement through the park service units.

The Susquehanna-Roseland project does not require significant widening of the existing right of way: The current utility corridor through National Park Service lands is four miles long, with cleared widths of up to 200 feet. The only additional right of way and clearing needed by the utilities is 50 additional feet of right of way for 0.7 miles in Pennsylvania where the existing corridor is now 100 feet wide.

The Obama administration selected the Susquehanna-Roseland line as one of seven transmission lines nationwide for fast-track treatment by the administration’s Rapid Response Team for Transmission. The team is expected to streamline the review and permitting of transmission line projects to increase reliability and save consumers money by modernizing the grid, while ensuring careful federal review. The project will create about 2,000 jobs during its three-year construction period.

The National Park Service expects to issue a Record of Decision on the Susquehanna-Roseland project by Oct. 1. The utilities are planning to have the power line in service in time to meet peak summer electricity demand in 2015.

PPL Electric Utilities, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation (NYSE: PPL), provides electric delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania and has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com.

 

January 31, 2012 - Chosen Route is Best for Susquehanna-Roseland Project, Utilities Say
PPL Electric Utilities and Public Service Electric and Gas Provide Additional Details of
Major Land Purchases Offered to National Park Service as Mitigation

The utilities' chosen route for the Susquehanna-Roseland transmission project is the best alternative for the power line needed by millions of electric customers in the region, the companies building the project told the National Park Service in formal comments filed Tuesday (1/31).

Public Service Electric and Gas Co. and PPL Electric Utilities Corp. also provided more details on their proposal to mitigate for unavoidable impacts of the project by preserving thousands of acres of land to enhance public enjoyment of natural resources in the area.

Below is a summary of key points in the utilities' comments:

Other NPS alternatives would have more impact: Other alternative routes proposed by the National Park Service would require the companies to cut new corridors through forests and communities in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This would require significantly more forest clearing. The companies' route – already approved by regulators in both states – uses a corridor that already exists.

Utilities' route follows existing power line corridor through NPS areas: There already is a transmission line through the three areas of the National Park Service. The line was there decades before the park units were created. Using the pre-existing, cleared corridor for the Susquehanna-Roseland project makes the most sense to limit overall regional impact.

"No-action" alternative does not prevent impacts: If the National Park Service chooses the "no action" alternative, the utilities still will need to rebuild the 85-year-old transmission line that now crosses the three NPS units. This reconstruction project will have the same construction impacts as the utilities' chosen alternative, and will replace the current lattice-style towers with steel poles between 130 feet and 160 feet high, as required by today's design standards. In addition, "no action" could lead to reliability problems in the Northeast power grid.

Utilities already have property rights through NPS lands: The companies have an existing property easement through the three National Park Service units that provides the legal right to rebuild the existing power line. The line must be rebuilt because it is nearing the end of its useful life.

Susquehanna-Roseland project does not require significant widening of existing right of way: The current utility corridor through the three National Park Service units is four miles long with cleared widths of up to 200 feet. The only additional right of way and clearing needed by the utilities to build the Susquehanna-Roseland line is 50 feet of additional right of way for 0.7 miles where the corridor is now 100 feet wide. The draft environmental impact statement incorrectly states that the existing cleared corridor would have to be much wider.

Additional information on mitigation

The utilities also provided additional detail on their proposal to mitigate for unavoidable impacts of the Susquehanna-Roseland project, if the National Park Service approves the utilities' chosen route.

First, the utilities will avoid and minimize impacts by using best management practices during construction of the power line, including measures identified by the National Park Service in its draft environmental impact statement. The best way to minimize impact is to use the existing corridor rather than cutting new corridors in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, the comments said.

Recognizing that building the Susquehanna-Roseland line would have unavoidable impacts, the utilities have proposed as compensatory mitigation the purchase or preservation of thousands of acres of land – identified as priorities by conservation groups – to expand public landholdings, to support the mission of the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior, and to enhance the enjoyment of the public.

Areas and agencies that would benefit directly from these purchases would be:

  • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.
  • Appalachian National Scenic Trail.
  • Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River.
  • New Jersey and Pennsylvania state land conservation agencies.
  • Other natural, conservation and recreational agencies and interests.

The companies already have identified parcels on the market, and have matched this list to the priorities identified as particularly important to the mission of the National Park Service, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and other conservation agencies and groups.

The final value of the mitigation package will depend on the final assessment of impacts determined by the National Park Service. The utilities believe, based on their own estimates at this time, that the cost of land purchases would be $30 million to $40 million.

The utilities would establish and endow the Middle Delaware Mitigation Fund, to be administered by a nonprofit organization. Monies from the fund would be used to preserve, restore and enhance the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge, and the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River.

The utilities would provide half the money for the fund when construction begins in either the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area or across the Appalachian Trail, and would provide the balance of the funds when construction is complete and the Susquehanna-Roseland power line is placed in service.

"We have made a compelling case that our chosen route is the overall best path to provide for the needs of electric customers while minimizing impacts," said Ralph LaRossa, president and chief operating officer of PSE&G, and David G. DeCampli, president of PPL Electric Utilities, in a joint statement.

"Our mitigation proposal would provide significant benefits for the public, and would more than offset unavoidable impacts of this needed project."

The National Park Service has said it will announce its decision on the route in March.

The new Susquehanna-Roseland power line is being built to maintain the reliability of the electric grid for millions of people in the Northeast region. In addition, it will save consumers more than $200 million per year by relieving congestion on the power grid, which will reduce electric bills for some customers.

The new power line will run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J. The independent regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, ordered the new line to prevent violations of national standards for the operation of the nation's electric power grid. PJM recently reconfirmed the need for the line. Construction of the line will create thousands of jobs for the region.

PPL's comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement

Exhibits Short videos showing constraints on
NPS alternative routes


January 19, 2012 - Utilities Will Offer to Expand, Enhance National Parks
Major Land Acquisitions Would Mitigate for Construction of Proposed Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line

Recognizing that the Susquehanna-Roseland power line would have impacts on federal lands, the utilities building the project will propose a mitigation package that would have significant benefits for the public, three National Park Service units, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and other public land-managing agencies.

Mitigation is a routine part of the environmental impact review process when power lines or other infrastructure improvements impact federal lands. It is typically required by federal agencies for impacts that cannot be avoided.
 
Under the mitigation package to be proposed by PPL Electric Utilities Corp. and Public Service Electric & Gas Co., thousands of acres of land – identified as priorities by conservation groups – would be purchased or preserved at a cost of tens of millions of dollars.

These acquisitions would protect scenic vistas for hikers on the Appalachian Trail and significantly expand National Park Service land holdings in and around the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area – one of the most visited park service units in the nation.
 
In addition, the mitigation package could potentially bridge gaps between existing federal and state lands in the area. This would create a half-million-acre swath of contiguous publicly owned or preserved natural lands for recreation and wildlife preservation within easy driving distance of major Northeast metropolitan areas.

The utilities will outline more details of the mitigation proposal when they file their comments on the National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project. The draft is open for comment through the end of January.

The tracts of land that could be acquired or preserved have been identified as particularly important to the National Park Service's mission, resources and values. In addition, acquiring the tracts would prevent development and protect wildlife corridors in the region.

To advise and assist in executing the land transactions, the utilities are working with a number of national, regional and local organizations to conserve lands that have benefits for scenery, wildlife, water quality, outdoor recreation and other public values.

The new Susquehanna-Roseland power line is being built to maintain the reliability of the electric grid for millions of people in the Northeast region. In addition, it is estimated that the project will save consumers more than $200 million per year by relieving congestion on the power grid, which will reduce electric bills for some customers.

The two utilities have been working to develop a mitigation proposal for several months. Mitigation includes three components – avoiding impacts, minimizing impacts and compensating for unavoidable impacts on federal lands.

"The National Park Service correctly sets a very high bar for protecting and enhancing federal lands as part of this process," said Ralph LaRossa, president and chief operating officer of PSE&G. "We are committed to doing the right thing as we meet our obligation to keep the lights on reliably, safely and cost effectively for millions of homes and businesses."

"This mitigation would be an example of the excellent result that is possible when public and private interests work together for the common good," said David G. DeCampli, president of PPL Electric Utilities. "The mitigation package, if accepted as part of the National Park Service decision-making process, would have a lasting benefit for National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service lands, for conservation and wildlife interests, and for the people who visit these areas now and in the future."

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line will run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J.  The independent regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, ordered the new line to prevent violations of national standards for the operation of the nation's electric power grid. PJM recently reconfirmed the need for the line.

The utilities' chosen route has already been approved by both the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. About 95 percent of this 145-mile route would follow the path of an existing 85-year-old power line that must be replaced because it is approaching the end of its useful life and is undersized for today's electricity demands. Following an existing power line route would help reduce the project's overall impact on people and the environment.

About four miles of this route would cross the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. The land acquisition package is intended to mitigate for impacts to these federal lands if the utilities' application is approved.

The Obama administration selected the Susquehanna-Roseland line as one of seven transmission lines nationwide for fast-track treatment by the administration's Rapid Response Team for Transmission. The team is expected to streamline the review and permitting of transmission line projects to increase reliability and save consumers money by modernizing the grid, while still ensuring careful federal review. The project will create thousands of jobs during its three-year construction period.
 
PPL Electric Utilities, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation (NYSE: PPL), provides electric delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania and has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com
.



December 2, 2011 -
Project takes important steps forward: NPS releases draft environmental impact statement, federal government puts line on "fast track"

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line project continues to move forward. The National Park Service has released its draft environmental impact statement, and the federal government has "fast-tracked" the project by naming it to a list of power lines to be handled by a new federal Rapid Response Team.

We continue to expect to have the line built and in service by spring of 2015. We continue to make progress on getting construction permits, and we continue to design and plan the construction of the power line.

Here are more details on the latest developments:

National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement

Our chosen route follows the path of an existing power line through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and across the Appalachian Trail. This is why the park service is reviewing our application to use this route.

The National Park Service has not yet made a final decision on our application. As expected, the draft environmental impact statement identified the "environmentally preferred alternative" as "no action." However, this designation is separate from the final decision, in which the National Park Service will choose the "NPS Preferred Alternative" that takes into account environmental impacts and a number of other factors. That final decision will be announced next fall.

Identifying the alternative that would have the least impact on the environment is required by the federal review process. The "no action" designation has been identified at this stage of other federal environmental impact statements, and these projects have then gone on to be built successfully.

Federal fast-track designation

In naming the Susquehanna-Roseland line to the initial list of projects for the new federal Rapid Response Team, the Obama administration recognizes the importance of the new power line and the need for swift action on federal permits. We applaud the administration's efforts to ensure that high-priority electric infrastructure projects are built and placed in service in a timely manner.

The Rapid Response Team for Transmission is expected to accelerate review and permitting of transmission line projects to increase reliability and save consumers money by modernizing the grid.

The project will improve electric service reliability for millions of people. As an added benefit, its construction will create thousands of needed jobs in this region.

Facts about the Susquehanna-Roseland project

The route we have chosen, which passes through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, makes the most sense because there already is an existing power line on that route – a line that was in service long before the recreation area was created. We already own right of way that allows reconstruction of the existing line through the park service lands.

The existing line through is more than 80 years old and needs replacement, providing an ideal opportunity to use the route in a way that minimizes impact on people and the environment. In fact, the chosen route uses an existing power line path for 95 percent of its 145-mile total distance from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J.

An estimated 2,000 jobs will be created by the multiyear construction of the Susquehanna-Roseland line, according to university studies. The project represents a $1.2 billion investment in reliability and in local economies.


October 5, 2011 - Federal Government Recognizes Need for Swift Action on Permits
for Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line

In naming the Susquehanna-Roseland power line to the initial list of projects for a new federal Rapid Response Team, the Obama administration recognizes the importance of the new power line and the need for swift action on federal permits, PPL Electric Utilities officials said Wednesday (10/5).

"We applaud the administration's efforts to ensure that high-priority electric infrastructure projects are built and placed in service in a timely manner," said David G. DeCampli, president of PPL Electric Utilities. "This project will improve electric service reliability for millions of people. As an added benefit, its construction will create thousands of needed jobs in this region."

The Rapid Response Team for Transmission is expected to accelerate review and permitting of transmission line projects to increase reliability and save consumers money by modernizing the grid.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line will strengthen the regional power system by helping prevent overloads of other transmission lines.

The line, which will connect a substation near Berwick, Pa., with one in Roseland, N.J., already has been approved by both the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. It is being developed by PPL Electric Utilities and Public Service Electric and Gas Co.

Currently, the project is under review by the National Park Service, which is performing an environmental impact statement. The NPS review is needed because the route chosen by the utilities crosses a total of 4 miles of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

The route through these park service areas makes the most sense, DeCampli said, because there already is an existing power line on that route – a line that was in service long before the parks were created. The utilities own right of way that allows reconstruction of the existing line through the park service lands.

The existing line through the NPS areas is more than 80 years old and needs replacement, providing an ideal opportunity to use the route in a way that minimizes impact on people and the environment. In fact, DeCampli said, the route chosen by the two utilities uses an existing power line path for 95 percent of its 145-mile total distance from Berwick to Roseland.

An estimated 2,000 jobs will be created by the multiyear construction of the Susquehanna-Roseland line, according to university studies. The project represents a $1.2 billion investment in reliability and in local economies.

"We look forward to working cooperatively with the Rapid Response Team – as we have been with the National Park Service – to ensure a thorough and comprehensive review in a timely manner," DeCampli said, "and to help ensure that a decision on federal permits is made in a timely way."

PPL Electric Utilities, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation (NYSE: PPL), provides electric delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania and has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com.

March 14, 2011 - Regional grid operator once again reaffirms need for Susquehanna-Roseland power line

PJM Interconnection, the independent company that operates the electric power grid for a 13-state region including Pennsylvania, has once again reaffirmed the need for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project to ensure electric service reliability for millions of people in the region.

The PJM released its annual project assessment Monday (3/14) as part of the 2010 Regional Transmission Expansion Planning Report. The PJM's most recent analysis confirms that the line is needed by 2012 to prevent overloads on other power lines in the region, the report says. PJM has developed a strategy to deal with potential reliability problems until the line is built.

The route chosen by PPL Electric Utilities and Public Service Electric & Gas follows the route of an existing transmission line for more than 90 percent of its path.

The power line, which would run from Berwick, Pa., to Roseland, N.J., already has been approved by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. It is currently under review by the National Park Service because it crosses – using an existing power line corridor – the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, and the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River.

September 27, 2010 - Record power use in region this summer

Electric customers in the region used a record amount of electricity this summer, according to preliminary data from the PJM Interconnection, the independent operator of the regional electric grid.

Electricity use in June, July and August was 203,681,531 megawatt-hours (203,681,531,000 kilowatt-hours), PJM said. The previous record for summer use of electricity in PJM was 203,415,406 megawatt-hours in 2005.

The amount of regional electricity used in summer 2010 was about 12 percent more than the summer of 2009, which was cooler than normal, according to PJM.

During the summer months of 2010 in the PJM region, the need for air conditioning was 37 percent higher than normal and 47 percent higher than last summer, according to data from the National Weather Service.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line project will help prevent overloads on existing power lines in the regional grid. It will help ensure that all electric customers have the power they need – especially during periods of peak demand such as hot summer days.

September 13, 2010 - State-approved route for Susquehanna-Roseland project is best for region and environment, utilities tell National Park Service in formal comments

The chosen route for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project – already approved by state regulators in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and already following an existing power line right of way – is the most reasonable and least impactful path for this critical improvement to the region's electrical infrastructure, according to formal comments submitted Monday (9/13) to the National Park Service by PPL Electric Utilities and Public Service Electric and Gas Co.

The utilities reviewed the routes that would be necessary to connect to alternative routes proposed by the park service. Routes other than the one chosen by the utilities would have more impact on people and the environment, and some have "critical flaws" that would make them infeasible to build, according to the utility comments. In addition, choosing a route other than the one already approved by both states would increase costs and cause additional delays that would leave millions of people throughout the region vulnerable to problems with their electricity service.

The two utilities filed their joint comments as part of the park service's Environmental Impact Statement process for the Susquehanna-Roseland line. A permit is needed from the park service for the line to cross the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, and the Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River.

The utilities also proposed one additional option for consideration: The power line could be constructed entirely within the existing right of way already owned by the two utilities in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, eliminating the need for the park service to grant additional right of way.

Currently, the only additional right of way needed on any park service lands is an additional 50 feet of right of way that PPL has requested on a 0.8-mile segment in the recreation area in Pennsylvania. PPL has determined that it could build the line on a 100-foot path in this segment if necessary. The companies urged the park service to evaluate formally this "existing right of way" option as one of the alternatives it is studying.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line is needed to prevent overloads on existing power lines in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, according to the PJM Interconnection, the independent entity responsible for reliability of the electric grid. The PJM requested the line to be completed by 2012, but the utilities said recently that the line won't be in service until 2014 or later, primarily because of delays in obtaining a permit from the National Park Service.

If the park service chooses a route other than the one already approved by state regulators, significant additional delays are expected because of the need to resubmit the new route to regulators in both New Jersey and Pennsylvania. This review process, in addition to time needed for redesign and acquisition of new right of way from private landowners, would add years to the time frame of the project, the utilities said.

Additional delays would have a direct impact on electric customers – both by increasing the likelihood of brownouts or even blackouts during periods of high electricity use, and by resulting in higher costs for the project.

Officials of both utilities commended the National Park Service – and Superintendents John Donahue of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River, and Pamela Underhill of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail – for the careful park service study of the issue and for the thorough public comment process, which included three public hearings. The utilities have been cooperating with the park service throughout the process and have met regularly with park service officials to exchange information.

The utilities' filing included detailed, specific comments on the flaws and impacts of each park service alternative route.

Many would require much more tree clearing than the route already approved in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and would have additional environmental impacts. Others are drawn by the park service on paths where no right of way currently exists, or where right of way is owned by utilities other than PPL and PSE&G. Some of the routes come closer to population centers, where the overall regional impact would be greater than having the line path go through the recreation area.

The utilities also made the point that the route chosen by the two companies and approved by state regulators crosses the park service lands on the path of an existing 230-kilovolt line, which existed decades before the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area was created, and which expressly contains rights to construct additional utility lines.

The existing power line will have to remain in the recreation area, the utilities said, even if the park service chooses an alternative route, because it is needed for regional reliability. The exception is park service Alternative 3, which may allow for the existing line to be removed. In addition, because of its age, the existing line will have to be rebuilt within 10 years – whether or not the Susquehanna-Roseland line is built along that path.

The utilities concluded that only the chosen route can meet the region's critical electric needs in a timely way while having the least impact on people, the environment and on project costs – which are paid by electric customers.

A full copy of the filing has been posted on PPL's project website at www.pplreliablepower.com.

PPL Electric Utilities Corporation, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation that provides electricity delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania, has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com.

August 2, 2010 - National Park Service proposes 'alternate routes' that could have additional impacts on people and the environment
Public comments invited


map

The National Park Service has proposed "alternative routes" for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line as part of the agency's Environmental Impact Statement process.

PPL Electric Utilities has studied the proposal carefully, and has concluded that the alternatives proposed by the park either are not feasible, or would create significant additional impacts to people and the environment in the region.

The best option for this project is the route already approved by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities.

Several of the park service alternatives, if chosen by the National Park Service, would force PPL Electric Utilities to consider building the line on all or part of Route C – a route that was rejected by the company as having too much impact on people and the environment.

The map above shows the chosen route, the park service alternatives and Route C.

The National Park Service is taking public comments on the alternative routes it has proposed. No more public open houses are scheduled, but there are two additional ways you can comment:

  1. On the Internet.

  2. By mail. Write to National Park Service, ATTN: DEWA PPL EIS Planning Team, DSC-P, P.O. Box 25287, Denver, CO 80225-0287

To be considered, comments must be received by September 14, 2010.

August 18, 2010 - Saw Creek, PPL Reach Agreement

The Saw Creek Community Association has agreed to drop its opposition to the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project.

The association will withdraw its appeal in Commonwealth Court of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission's decision to approve the power line project.

Saw Creek also has agreed not to oppose the use of the chosen route through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area, which is currently the subject of review and public hearings by the National Park Service.

The financial settlement will fund energy efficiency improvements in Saw Creek Estates and will reimburse the community for certain expenses including vegetative screening, road maintenance, and legal expenses.

"We're pleased to reach agreement with Saw Creek and we commend the board of directors for their decision to settle this matter," said Greg Smith, manager of Transmission Expansion for PPL Electric Utilities.

"This settlement is another important step forward for the project, which is needed to ensure reliable service for all electric customers in the region," Smith said. The chosen route has already received approvals from the major utility regulators in both states – the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities."

April 14, 2010 - PPL Electric Utilities files community education plan

PPL Electric Utilities has filed a Community Education Plan describing activities to be undertaken by the company to educate communities located along the Pennsylvania portion of the Susquehanna-Roseland power line route. These activities will be part of PPL Electric Utilities' long-standing philosophy to provide comprehensive and proactive outreach to members of the community and other key audiences. Filing the plan was a requirement of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission order approving the project.  For a copy of the plan, click here.

March 18, 2010 - PPL Electric Utilities awards major contract for
Susquehanna-Roseland power line

HAZLETON, Pa. (March 18, 2010) – Continuing its advance planning for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line, PPL Electric Utilities has awarded a major contract to a company with plants in the Hazleton area – a move expected to create more than 50 new jobs and pump millions of dollars into the regional economy.

Valmont Industries Inc., with plants in Hazleton and West Hazleton, will design and manufacture the steel poles for the 101-mile Pennsylvania segment of the line. The contract, awarded through a competitive bidding process, will lead to a significant boost for the two manufacturing facilities, Valmont officials said.

"We're pleased to award this contract, valued in excess of $70 million, to a local employer so that the positive economic benefits will accrue to the people here in the PPL Electric Utilities home territory," said David G. DeCampli, president of PPL Electric Utilities. "As a result, this line not only will provide more reliable electric service, but it also will provide economic stimulus at a time when the region really needs it."

"We can foresee the need to add highly skilled and well-paid jobs to our local work force," said Valmont General Manager Paul Fallon. He said the contract is significant, both in terms of the new jobs and in terms of what it means for the company's long-term prospects as a solid employer in the region.

"We congratulate both Valmont and PPL Electric Utilities, but the real beneficiary today is Greater Hazleton," said Kevin O'Donnell, president of CAN DO Inc., a nonprofit economic development corporation serving the region. "It's not every day when your community can say that one of our local employers received a contract worth in excess of $70 million that will create more than 50 quality new jobs."

Timing of the new jobs and economic benefits for the region depends on the timing of construction, DeCampli said. Major approvals already have been received from the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. Additional approval is needed from the National Park Service, which has said its environmental review could take until early 2012.

"We're working to obtain all approvals and move forward with this project," DeCampli said. "This line is needed for regional electric service reliability. It will prevent overloads on other regional power lines, making it less likely that a problem with one power line would lead to a regional blackout like the one that affected millions of people in August 2003."

The regional economic benefits of the Valmont Industries contract are in addition to the benefits expected from construction of the Susquehanna-Roseland line. Construction will create 165 to 330 jobs, resulting in a positive economic impact to the region of $100 million for the three-year period, according to an economic impact study by Penn State's Workforce Education and Development Initiative Team.

More information on the Susquehanna-Roseland project can be found at www.pplreliablepower.com.

PPL Electric Utilities Corporation, a subsidiary of PPL Corporation (NYSE: PPL) that provides electricity delivery services to about 1.4 million customers in Pennsylvania, has consistently ranked among the best companies for customer service in the United States. More information is available at www.pplelectric.com.

November 13, 2009 - Pennsylvania PUC Judge Recommends Approval of Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line

A Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission administrative law judge on Nov. 13, 2009 recommended approval of the proposed Susquehanna-Roseland power line in Pennsylvania.

The recommendation is another important step in the PUC review process for this new transmission line, which will improve the reliability of electric service for millions of people in Pennsylvania and throughout the region.

The power line will strengthen the regional electric grid and prevent overloads on other major power lines, ensuring that electricity users will continue to have power when they need it the most – the hottest summer days and the coldest winter nights.

PPL Electric Utilities hosted 22 public open houses since announcing the project and has participated in four public input hearings run by the PUC. In addition, we have had thousands of conversations with residents along the route, seeking input on everything from route selection to power line design. We will continue to keep an open dialogue with residents, public officials and other interested parties as this project moves forward.

The next step in Pennsylvania is a review of the recommended decision by the PUC, which is expected to render a decision in January.

The line also needs approval by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. Additional review is required by the National Park Service because the line follows the route of an existing power line through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, and because it crosses the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in New Jersey.

October 15, 2009 - PJM BOARD APPROVES ANNUAL GRID UPGRADE PLAN
Plan includes $1.4 billion in new upgrades and additions, Reaffirms need for major projects

(Valley Forge, Pa. Oct. 15, 2009) The PJM Interconnection Board has authorized an additional $1.4 billion in electric transmission systems additions and upgrades throughout the grid that serves 51 million people in 13 states and the District of Columbia. The upgrades are required to keep electricity flowing and ensure the power supply system meets national standards through 2024. 

There's nothing more essential to our business than planning for and achieving the infrastructure needed to ensure the reliable power supplies consumers expect, said PJM President and CEO Terry Boston. The upgrades that the Board has approved represent dozens of projects that individually and collectively maintain the reliability of the power system.

The upgrades authorized by the PJM Board since 2000, including the most recent approvals, total more than $14.7 billion in investment. They result from PJM's Regional Transmission Expansion Planning process which evaluates electric transmission changes and needs over a 15-year horizon. This plan allows time to make the necessary infrastructure upgrades and improvements and to adjust to ever changing needs.

The current regional plan reaffirms the need for several major transmission line projects that the board previously had authorized to address power supply problems. These so-called transmission backbone projects are:

  • Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line (TrAIL), 502 Junction to Loudon.  Construction is well under way on TrAIL, and it will be in service in 2011. This 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will run from near the border of Pennsylvania and West Virginia to northern Virginia. 
  • Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, (PATH), Amos to Kemptown. This 765-kV transmission line will extend about 300 miles from the Amos Substation in West Virginia to the Kemptown Substation in Maryland.
  • Susquehanna to Roseland. This 500-kV line will run approximately 130 miles from northern Pennsylvania to northern New Jersey.
  • Mid Atlantic Power Pathway Project (MAPP). This 500-kV line will connect the Possum Point Substation in Virginia to Indian River Substation on the Delmarva Peninsula.

In addition to the studies to determine what transmission additions and upgrades are necessary to ensure reliability, the PJM planning process included 195 studies that evaluated the impact of adding new generation on the system.

Studies of other projects remain underway as PJM continually analyzes regional transmission needs. The PJM Board periodically reviews proposed updates to the regional transmission plan.

PJM Interconnection ensures the reliability of the high-voltage electric power system serving 51 million people in all or parts of Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. PJM coordinates and directs the operation of the region's transmission grid, which includes 6,038 substations and 56,350 miles of transmission lines; administers a competitive wholesale electricity market; and plans regional transmission expansion improvements to maintain grid reliability and relieve congestion. Visit PJM at www.pjm.com.

September 18, 2009 - PUC review continues; PJM reaffirms need for line
Here is the latest update on the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project:

PUC review process continues — The PUC continues to review our application to build the Pennsylvania portion of this power line. Recently, the PUC held hearings regarding the line in Harrisburg. The PUC administrative law judge is expected to issue a recommended decision in November, and a final decision by the PUC is expected in January.

PJM reaffirms need for the line — PJM Interconnection, the independent organization responsible for maintaining reliable service on the electric transmission grid, recently reviewed the need for the line in light of the temporary reduction in demand for electricity due to the recession. The most recent PJM analysis confirms that the Susquehanna-Roseland line still is needed to make sure residents continue to receive reliable electric service. The line will prevent overloads on other regional power lines. These overloads could lead to reliability problems and even blackouts during periods of extremely high demand – such as the hottest summer days and the coldest winter nights. Every resident of this area and the surrounding region will benefit from this power line because it will ensure the reliable delivery of electricity long into the future.

Preliminary work continues — We are continuing our studies along the power line route to gather information required for the approval process. This work includes such things as surveying, wildlife studies, archaeological studies and core borings to get information about the soil beneath the surface. For this reason, you may see our crews on the power line right of way from time to time. No construction work on this line would begin without PUC approval. 

Your questions and comments are welcome — Our goal is to ensure that you get the information you need so that you can better understand this project and continue to provide us with feedback on our efforts. Feel free to call us anytime on our special toll-free number, 1-800-291-5403, or e-mail us from the project Web site, www.pplreliablepower.com.


June 24, 2009 - Environmental, engineering work continues

Crews continue to perform various kinds of work along the Susquehanna-Roseland power line route.

This work includes environmental and other studies to ensure that the project can be built in a way that is sensitive to the environment. The work also includes such preliminary engineering work as surveying, staking and soil borings. This work is for planning and design purposes; no construction can begin on the line until it has been approved by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.

There also may be some tree trimming or tree removal work along the power lines that currently exist on the Susquehanna-Roseland route. This work is part of the periodic tree maintenance we conduct to ensure safe and reliable operation of electric transmission lines in our system.

PPL Electric Utilities is required to trim or remove trees that may fall into or grow into these lines and cause power outages for our customers. This work is not related to the Susquehanna-Roseland project.

If you have questions about any aspect of this project, please feel free to call our special toll-free number, 1-800-291-5403, or e-mail us by
click here.



March 30, 2009 - Another round of public open houses April 13-16

As part of our continuing effort to include information from the public in our plans to build the Susquehanna-Roseland transmission line, we have scheduled four more open houses from April 13-16. In addition to these open houses sponsored by PPL Electric Utilities, the Public Utility Commission will schedule public input hearings as part of its review of the line.

During prior open houses, and in other conversations with residents and property owners, we have received valuable input on our plans. We urge you to attend these events both to learn about what is going on with the project and to provide your input and suggestions to us.

There is no set agenda for these meetings and there will be no formal presentations.
Open houses are scheduled to take place from 6-8 p.m. on:

Monday, April 13
Newton Ransom Fire Hall
1890 Newton Ransom Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411

Tuesday, April 14
PPL Wallenpaupack Environmental Learning Center
Route 6
Hawley, PA 18428

Wednesday, April 15
Black Diamond Post 395 -
American Legion
386 Wyoming Ave. No. 2
Kingston, PA 18704

Thursday, April 16
Fernwood Hotel and Resort
River Road and Route 209
Bushkill, PA 18324

For more information, please call our special toll-free Susquehanna-Roseland information line at 1-800-291-5403 or visit the project Web site, www.pplreliablepower.com. We hope to see you there.

March 23, 2009 - Night-time wildlife studies scheduled, other work continues

Crews will be doing various kinds of work along the route of the Susquehanna-Roseland power line. We're conducting various studies required by Pennsylvania's power line approval process, and we wanted you to be aware that you may be seeing this activity on the route over the next several months. This work includes:

Night-time wildlife studies – As part of our work to survey the route for any threatened or endangered species, we will be doing some wildlife studies during evening and night-time hours. This time frame is necessary because certain species are active only at night. The work will be done by certified wildlife scientists and technicians, and is a routine part of the power line approval process. Typically, a crew will be at each location for two consecutive nights, weather permitting. In addition to this letter, if you live immediately adjacent to the route, we will make every effort to contact you personally just before this night-time work is scheduled in your area.

Archeological studies  – Technicians will use shovels to dig small holes in the right of way to find out if any historical artifacts may be beneath the surface. We'll refill each hole before leaving the area. This work, already under way in some locations, also is a routine part of the power line approval process.

Survey work – Surveyors will be doing their work along the right of way as part of the design process for the power line. PPL Electric Utilities also plans to periodically inspect and mark proposed pole locations along the Susquehanna-Roseland route to assist in the design process.
Geotechnical surveys – This work, which will be performed by several people, will require the use of a drill rig and pickup trucks. At each pole location, up to three holes, each about three inches wide, will be dug to identify the soil conditions. The hole will be filled in upon completion of the required work. Typically, work at each location will take one to two days to complete.

Plant surveys – Crews will be conducting various plant surveys between mid-April and early September on various parts of the power line corridor. The exact schedule will vary depending on the growing season for each species. The survey crew will likely consist of one or two people.

Routine Tree Work – You also may notice some tree trimming or tree removal work being completed along the power lines that currently exist on the Susquehanna-Roseland route. This work is part of the periodic tree maintenance we conduct to ensure safe and reliable operation of electric transmission lines in our system. PPL Electric Utilities is required to trim or remove trees that may fall into or grow into these lines and cause power outages for our customers. This work is not related to the Susquehanna-Roseland project.

If you have questions about any aspect of this project, please feel free to call our special toll-free number, 1-800-291-5403, or e-mail us from the project Web site, www.pplreliablepower.com.

February 11, 2009 - Work Scheduled along power line route

During the time that the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission is reviewing our application to build this project, we will move forward with final design work. This work will determine where each of the new poles would be placed, where access roads would be needed, and other details. Construction will not begin until the project is approved by the PUC.

Near the end of February, PPL Electric Utilities will begin archeological survey work along the section of the Susquehanna-Roseland route between Lake Wallenpaupack and the Bushkill area. This routine work, part of any project of this size, will consist of minimal digging with shovels to identify if any historical artifacts may be beneath the surface. This work should be completed in mid-April.

During March, PPL Electric Utilities will begin surveying work in this same area. We expect this work to take about eight weeks to complete. From mid-April until the end of May, crews will then conduct geotechnical studies in this area. This work, which will be performed by several people, will require the use of a drill rig and pickup trucks. At each pole location, up to three holes, each about three inches wide, will be dug to identify the soil conditions. The holes will be filled in upon completion of the required work. Typically, work at each location will take one to two days to complete.
PPL Electric Utilities also plans to periodically inspect the proposed pole locations along the entire Susquehanna-Roseland route to identify any potential issues. During this time, you may notice people completing this work on the right of way.

You also may notice some tree trimming or tree removal work being completed along the power lines that currently exist on the Susquehanna-Roseland route. This work is part of the periodic tree maintenance we conduct to ensure safe and reliable operation of electric transmission lines in our system. PPL Electric Utilities is required to trim or remove trees that may fall into or grow into these lines and cause power outages for our customers. This work is not related to the Susquehanna-Roseland project.

If you have questions about any aspect of this project, please feel free to call our special toll-free number, 1-800-291-5403, or e-mail us from the project Web site, www.pplreliablepower.com.

January 6, 2009 - Line submitted to Pa. PUC for approval

After 18 public meetings and thousands of conversations with residents along the route – and after seeking public input on everything from route selection to line design – PPL Electric Utilities has submitted to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission its application to site and build the Susquehanna-Roseland power line.
>> Read PUC filing

>> Read news release

December 19, 2008 - Routine tree work may occur along line route

Residents may notice some tree trimming or removal work being done along the power lines that currently exist on the chosen route of the Susquehanna-Roseland project.

This work is part of the periodic tree maintenance we do to ensure safe and reliable operation of electric transmission lines in our system. We're required to trim or remove trees that may fall into or grow into these lines and cause power outages for our customers.

The work is not related to the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project, which must be approved by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission before construction can begin.

November 3, 2008 - Third round of public open houses scheduled

Continuing our effort to keep property owners informed and seek public input, PPL Electric Utilities has scheduled a third round of public open houses for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project.

We are dedicated to an open dialogue with property owners and the public, and encourage anyone with questions to attend the open house in their region. Open houses are scheduled as follows: 

  • Nov. 17 - Newton Ransom Fire Hall, 1890 Newton Ransom Blvd., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
  • Nov. 18 - PPL Wallenpaupack Environmental Learning Center, Route 6, Hawley, PA 18428.
  • Nov. 19 -  Fernwood Hotel and Resort, River Road and Route 209, Bushkill, PA 18324.
  • Nov. 20 - Black Diamond Post 395 - American Legion, 386 Wyoming Ave. No. 2 , Kingston, PA 18704.

As before, there will be no set agenda for these meetings and no formal presentation, so feel free to visit anytime between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. These open houses will be less information-intensive than previous ones and will focus more on obtaining information from residents on their specific concerns and answering their questions about the project. 

September 10, 2008 - Additional meetings held; environmental studies set

During the week of Aug. 25, PPL Electric Utilities completed four additional public open houses along the route and began learning more about issues of concern to local residents. We are now examining ways that we can be responsive to those concerns. We will continue this spirit of flexibility and outreach throughout the course of the project.

Listed below are some activities that are planned during the coming weeks:

• We will be conducting environmental studies, including detailed surveys of wetlands, wildlife, plants, habitats and cultural resources along our existing and proposed rights of way. These studies will be done by biologists, historians, archaeologists and other experts working in two- to three-person teams on the lands along the route. Property owners on or near the route may notice this activity beginning about Sept. 15 and running through about Nov. 30. Additional work is likely next spring and summer. The information gathered will be used to help minimize the environmental impact of the project.

• We will continue our meetings with property owners in cases where PPL Electric Utilities needs to acquire additional right of way. Although there is existing power line along 93 percent of this route, there are some cases where additional right of way will need to be acquired.

• You may also see some helicopter activity along the line. These flights, along the Susquehanna-Roseland route and in other areas of our service territory, are helping us more accurately map the exact position of our lines.

We will continue to provide updates as the project moves forward. Please feel free to contact us with questions or comments at our special toll-free number, 1-800-291-5403, or e-mail us by clicking here.

August 5, 2008 - Route B Selected

After an exhaustive study process that included 10 public input workshops throughout the region and numerous discussions with residents, elected officials and others, PPL Electric Utilities has chosen Route B as the route for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project in Pennsylvania.

The selected route runs north from Berwick, past Wilkes-Barre and Scranton, then east to Hawley and southeast to Bushkill where it crosses the Delaware River. It follows an existing power line for almost its entire distance.
The New Jersey portion of the power line, from the river to Roseland, will be built by Public Service Electric & Gas Co.

"Two of our main goals were to minimize the impact of this project on residents near the line, and on the environment," said David E. Schleicher, vice president-Transmission. "We are convinced that this is the best route to accomplish those goals while providing very real reliability benefits for electric customers in eastern Pennsylvania and throughout the region."

The 500-kilovolt power line is needed to handle increasing customer demand for electricity that could otherwise lead to overloads and even blackouts on the regional power grid. Because overloads can have widespread regional impacts, the line will benefit all electric customers in the region – regardless of where they live or which electric company serves their needs, Schleicher said.

He pointed out that the regional blackout of 2003, which started with power line failures in Ohio, spread as far as New York City, leaving nearly 50 million people without electricity. "The regional electricity transmission system is only as strong as its weakest link," he said.

The PJM Interconnection, which oversees reliability planning for the regional power grid, identified the need for the new line and assigned PPL Electric Utilities to build the Pennsylvania portion.
PJM determined that if this upgrade is not made by May 2012, there is the potential for overloads on other power lines. The danger is greatest during periods when demand is highest: the hottest summer days and the coldest winter nights.

Because this type of power line provides regional benefits, its cost is shared by all electric customers in PJM – a region of 51 million people encompassing 13 states and the District of Columbia.

"We understand that new power lines – even if they are built where existing lines now stand – can cause concern for nearby residents," Schleicher said. "We will work very hard with individual property owners to answer their questions and address their concerns about this project as we move forward."

PPL Electric Utilities evaluated three possible routes for the line. Two of the possible routes went north through Luzerne, Lackawanna, Wayne and Pike counties. The third possible route went south through Schuylkill, Lehigh and Northampton counties.

The decision to choose Route B was made after careful consideration of impacts along all three routes, and after considering public input. This route follows an existing power line for the great majority (93 percent) of its length. PPL Electric Utilities received extensive comments from interested people along all three routes – including comments made in person at public input workshops, by phone using a special toll-free number, and by e-mail from the project's Web site.

The company will ask the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to approve the route in an application that is expected to be filed in the fourth quarter of 2008. The PUC review process – which also includes input from the public – could take as long as a year. The line is scheduled to be in service by May 2012.

Construction of the line will provide an economic boost to the region of at least $100 million over three years, creating 165 to 330 construction jobs during the period, according to an economic impact study conducted by the Penn State Workforce Education and Development Initiative Team.

"This project will help ensure that PPL Electric Utilities can continue its longstanding record of providing excellent and reliable electric service to our customers in Pennsylvania, while supporting continued electric service reliability for all electric customers across the region," Schleicher said.

Click here for news release.

July 1, 2008 - Public Input Workshops Complete

We have completed the public workshops designed to gather input on the three alternative routes for the Susquehanna-Roseland power line project.

Over the next month, we'll be reviewing all comments and considering them carefully as we choose one of the three routes to recommend to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission for approval.

Thank you to everyone who attended the meetings or made comments by phone and e-mail. If you have additional questions or concerns, please call us toll-free at 1-800-291-5403 or e-mail us by logging on to www.pplreliablepower.com.

The Susquehanna-Roseland power line is needed to ensure reliable electric service for all electric customers in eastern and northeastern Pennsylvania and throughout the region. We'll keep you informed as we move forward with the process to complete this project.

June 13, 2008 - Workshop added in Milford area

PPL Electric Utilities has scheduled an additional public workshop on the Susquehanna-Roseland Power Line Project for the convenience of residents in the Milford, Pa., area. This is in addition to the eight other open houses being held along the potential line routes. The Milford public workshop will be held Monday, June 30, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Best Western Inn at Hunt's Landing in Matamoras. 

June 12, 2008 – Webcast for municipal officials

PPL Electric Utilities will host a webcast for municipal officials at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, June 12. The webcast will include an overview of the Susquehanna Roseland power line project, highlight the three possible line routes and give municipal officials a chance to ask questions.

To access the webcast, click here. If you cannot listen to the live webcast, you can use the link above to access a replay after the event.

June 5, 2008 - Possible routes identified; public input invited at workshops

PPL Electric Utilities has identified three possible routes, and is seeking public comment at a series of nine public input workshops throughout eastern and northeastern Pennsylvania. After considering public input – along with the data gathered during extensive study of the region – we will pick the preferred route for the project.

Possible project routes

PPL Electric Utilities has identified three possible routes that could be used for this project. We plan to pick one of them after considering public input.

Where practical, the routes follow paths of existing power lines or where the company already owns property or property rights. However, all of the routes would require the company to acquire some amount of new right of way.

The next important step is public input. We want your comments, and we will use your input to choose the best route. You are invited to attend one of nine public input workshops scheduled in communities along the possible routes.

Overview
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| high res
Routes A & B
Lackawanna-Wayne

.pdf document
Routes A & B
Luzerne-North

.pdf document
Routes A, B & C
Luzerne-South

.pdf document
Route C
Northampton-Lehigh

.pdf document
Routes A & B
Pike-North

.pdf document
Route B
Pike-South

.pdf document
Route C
Schuylkill-Lehigh

.pdf document

Route descriptions:

Route A begins at the PPL Electric Utilities switching station near Berwick and travels northeast through Luzerne and Lackawanna counties on the path of an existing 230-kV power line. The line then travels east through Lackawanna and Wayne counties primarily on the path of existing power lines before heading east-southeast through Pike County.

Route B begins at the PPL Electric Utilities switching station near Berwick and travels through Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wayne counties on the same power line rights of way as Route A. Route B separates from Route A at a point northeast of Lake Wallenpaupack and travels south through the Delaware State Forest on the path of an existing 230-kV power line.

Route C begins at the PPL Electric Utilities switching station near Berwick and travels south primarily on existing future-use right of way through Luzerne and Schuylkill counties. The line then travels east primarily on future-use or existing transmission power line routes in Schuylkill, Lehigh and Northampton counties.

After considering public input and examining the pros and cons of each potential route, we will choose one route for the project and begin working with residents along that route to minimize potential impacts and inconvenience as much as possible.

Before any construction can begin, PPL Electric Utilities will seek approval from the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to build the new power line.

Public input workshops:

Monday, June 16 (5-8 p.m.) 
PPL East Mountain Business Center, 1190 East Mountain Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

Tuesday, June 17 (5-8 p.m.) 
Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave., Scranton, PA 18503

Wednesday, June 18 (5-8 p.m.)
Wallenpaupack Area High School, 2552 Route 6, Hawley, PA 18428

Thursday, June 19 (5-8 p.m.)
Fernwood Resort & Conference Center, Route 209 and River Road, Bushkill, PA 18324

Monday, June 23 (5-8 p.m.) 
Berwick Area High School, 1100 Fowler Ave., Berwick, PA 18603

Tuesday, June 24 (5-8 p.m.) 
Tamaqua Community Center, 229 Center St. (rear), Tamaqua, PA 18252

Wednesday, June 25 (5-8 p.m.) 
Forks Township Community Center, 500 Zucksville Road, Easton, PA 18040

Thursday, June 26 (5-8 p.m.)
Northampton Community Center, 1601 Laubach Ave., Northampton, PA 18067

Monday, June 30 (5-8 p.m.)
Best Western Inn at Hunt's Landing, 120 Routes 6 and 209, Matamoras, PA 18336

For nearby residents
Property owners in a 1,000-foot corridor along each possible route have been mailed letters with details of the routes and an invitation to attend one of the workshops. All others who are interested also are welcome to attend a workshop of their choice, or to contact PPL directly by clicking here. You can also call us toll-free at 1-800-291-5403 and someone will get back to you as soon as possible.

Project news release (click here)
Here is the news release PPL Electric Utilities issued about the public input workshops and possible routes on June 5, 2008.

Project fact sheet (click here)
Here is a copy of the fact sheet mailed to property owners in a 1,000-foot corridor along each possible route.


April 9, 2008 - CEO of Greater Pocono Chamber supports project

The Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Pocono Chamber of Commerce supports the Susquehanna-Roseland project as vital to job creation and business growth, and as essential for the region's supply of dependable electricity.

Here's what Robert Phillips, President/CEO of the chamber, had to say:

"There is no doubt that demand for electricity in our region has been significantly increasing. The need to provide continual uninterrupted services is vital to our economic development, job creation and business growth. To prevent future overloads or even possible blackouts due to the current high demand on the existing system, a new power line is essential for the guarantee of dependable and efficient electricity. The Susquehanna-Roseland power line project will ensure future reliable service for our region's electricity supply."


Feb. 22, 2008 - Information gathering begins

We've started gathering the information we will need to pick the best possible route for the new power line. We will study aerial photography, maps and data from the Geographic Information System. (This system, often called GIS, contains computerized information on the social, natural, political and cultural features of the area.)

We will use all this information to help find possible routes for the power line. We'll also consider using existing power line routes, if practical, which could eliminate the need to build a new line where one does not already exist. read more >>


Jan. 30, 2008 - Experts: Pennsylvania has critical need for improved electrical infrastructure or state could face blackouts; demand for energy in state is currently outstripping supply

Harrisburg, PA – Pennsylvania businesses and citizens have an urgent need for improved electric transmission infrastructure or they could face rolling blackouts in just a matter of years. 

That was the message of state and national electric industry experts, along with representatives from Pennsylvania business and labor organizations, who held a news conference in Harrisburg today to sound the alarm on the need for updated electric transmission infrastructure in the region. read more >>


Jan. 21, 2008 – A new study – by Penn State's Workforce Education and Development Initiative Team – shows that construction of the Susquehanna-Roseland power line will create 165 to 330 temporary jobs, and will generate more than $100 million in benefits for the regional economy.

PPL Electric Utilities commissioned the study to identify economic benefits of the project.
Based on the study, PPL estimates the following benefits while the line is being designed and built from 2009 to 2012.

• 100 to 200 temporary construction jobs.
• 65 to 130 additional temporary jobs providing goods and services for the project.
• These jobs will mean $100 million for the regional economy.
• Additional annual local, state and federal wage tax revenues of $2 million to $4 million.

The Penn State Workforce Education and Development Initiative Team conducted the study using IMPLAN, a macroeconomic model. Click here for report.

PPL Electric Utilities 2008